BI352 History of Biblical Interpretation II: Seventeenth Century through the Present

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In BI351 Dr. Bray examines the foundations of the Old and New Testaments as well as the development of new theological perspectives since the 17th century. He outlines significant trends and major players in biblical criticism and how these relate to the modern scholarly climate. Dr. Bray provides guidance on how to approach Bible study and emphasizes the importance of applying God’s word.

Introduction

Introducing the Speaker and the Course

Introducing the Speaker and the Course

5m

The Beginnings of Critical Method

Textus Receptus and Christian Infighting

Textus Receptus and Christian Infighting

10m

Old Testament Criticism: Nineteenth—Twentieth Centuries

De Wette and the Reinterpretation of History

De Wette and the Reinterpretation of History

11m

Anglo-Saxon Old Testament Scholarship Since 1800

Characteristics of British and American Culture and Theology

Characteristics of British and American Culture and Theology

9m

Modern Old Testament Criticism

Do We Need the Old Testament?

Do We Need the Old Testament?

9m

New Testament Criticism: Eighteenth—Twentieth Centuries

Skepticism of Reimarus

Skepticism of Reimarus

8m

Anglo-Saxon New Testament Scholarship Since 1800

New Testament Textual Studies and the Cambridge School

New Testament Textual Studies and the Cambridge School

10m

Modern New Testament Criticism: Jesus and the Church

Form Criticism

Form Criticism

10m

Recent Trends in Interpretation

Inadequacies of the Historical-Critical Method

Inadequacies of the Historical-Critical Method

9m

An Evangelical Approach to Critical Issues

Background to Modern Evangelicalism

Background to Modern Evangelicalism

10m

An Evangelical Approach to Practical Application

Ways of Reading the Bible

Ways of Reading the Bible

10m

Conclusion

Biblical Interpretation: The Struggle to Understand God

Biblical Interpretation: The Struggle to Understand God

4m